I was very fortunate to attend the 5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference this year, August 3-6, 2012, at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate, New York.  Having attended last year too, I knew how special the event would be.  So I resolved to try and capture it through my blog, and share the magic with those who couldn't make it this year.  

Here's the thing.  Consider your favorite sight-seeing vacation, ever.  Maybe you strolled on a beach looking out into a vast blue ocean... or stood in the valley of a sweeping mountain range... or enjoyed a beautiful city skyline from the perfect vantage point.  Even while you're still pulling the camera out of its case, you already know your images will never capture more than a small fraction of the true experience.

And so it is with the conference.  After all, this is Charles Lewton-Brain.  There is so much that just couldn't be captured.  So take this for what it's worth-- an appetizer -- and consider attending next year.  

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Index of SueLacy Wired Blog Post Links, August 2012  
Topic:  5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference

11/28/2012: 2012 Foldform Competition Video
Winners and twenty Jurors' Choice notable submissions selected from hundreds of entries (video)

8/31/2012:  The entire August archive
To scroll through all the posts in reverse chronological order 

8/30/2012:  Blog INDEX for 5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference (this page)
Hot-linked list of all my conference posts, info re: next year's conference, joining our Facebook group. Here is a shortened link to save or share:  http://tinyurl.com/8ore8nh 

8/28/2012:
 How to start a foldform boat fold
Charles begins a basic boat fold, the jumping off point for countless boat variations (video)

8/26/2012:  If it's not pretty yet
Charles opens a beautiful star fold variation (video)

8/23/2012: Quotes from conference attendees and live blog readers
What are people saying about the conference?

8/22/2012: My first green patina experiment
Detailed instructions for ammonia fuming with hydrogen peroxide, based on Charles' patina demo.

8/17/2012:  When is metal annealed?
Annealing demonstration (video)

8/15/2012:   The unofficial CLB conference agenda
How the conference unfolded, based on one student's notes.

8/15/2012:  Our foldforming group on Facebook
The official group on Facebook gets a nod (video)

8/12/2012:  Next year's conference and a video clip
About next year's conference, and demo re: shorter leg length = more curvature (video) 

8/8/2012:  Live blog giveaway results
Which three lucky live-blog readers won a sample piece made by CLB?

8/7/2012:  Day Four catch-up
Demo reviews, Harbor Freight field trip, folds derived from paper models.

8/7/2012:  2012 Lewton-Brain Foldform Award Winners 
Photos and artist statements.  The work is simply breathtaking.

8/7/2012:  Day 4 of the 5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference
Unable to live blog / placeholder.

8/6/2012: Giveaway prizes from Charles
Prizes for the SueLacy Wired live-blog readers and meet the blogger

8/6/2012: Opening a boat fold
How to open a fold using lever action (video)

8/6/2012:  Hands-on Day 3
Students and their work; collage of evening outing fun.

8/6/2012:  Cross folds
Photos of demonstrated cross fold variations.

8/5/2012:  Boat folds and books
Photos of demonstrated boat fold variations and a list of recommended reading from Charles.

8/5/2012:  Center for Metal Arts and giveaway reminder
Big thank you to our hosts, Center for Metal Arts.

8/5/2012:  Hands-on time day 2 and a bowl
Students and their work; making a bowl with wedge T-folds (video)

8/5/2012:  Hammers for foldforming
Correct hammer shape and Charles modifying a hammer (video)

8/5/2012:  Early afternoon day 2
Wedge t-folds, table inserts, Romero fold, t-fold/chased-on-air combo, and scoring/bending. 

8/4/2012:  The morning of day two
Patina demo, rolled folds, T-folds, chasing tools lecture.

8/4/2012:  Dinner and screening of competition entries
A few pics from a lovely evening.

8/4/2012:  Demonstrating a star fold
Hammering a star fold variation (video)

8/4/2012:  Hands on time
Students and their work. 

8/4/2012:  Star folds and pleats day 1.
Star fold variations and pleats demonstrated.

8/3/2012:  The first morning
Lots covered including basic concepts and demos of line folds, rolled folds; Bench Tricks lecture.

8/3/2012:  Giveaway info
A quick update on the live-blog giveaway.

8/3/2012: Introductions at CLB conference
Must see photos of Center for Metal Arts and its showroom / museum.

8/2/2012:  Live Blog Info for 2012 Charles Lewton-Brain Conference
What to expect of the live-blog and how to view posts.

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Next year's conference

If you want to get an email notice about the DATE FOR NEXT YEAR'S CONFERENCE, email info@centerformetalarts.com with "CLB 2013" in the subject line.
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Are you a metalsmith
interested in foldforming? 


Join the official Facebook group! 
Foldforming Central
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SueLacy Wired

Thanks for reading SueLacy Wired
I've had so much fun with the blog this month.  Please stop by again. 
I post weekly and would love to see you.


 
 
Last year I learned to make a basic boat fold during hands-on time at the CLB workshop.  When I got home, though, I had a little trouble with it.  This clip would have been a helpful memory trigger.  Note that the boat begins with a loop of metal inserted into the vise like a wedge T-fold.

The boat fold is a base form (like the star) that has a bunch of variations.   If you want to see some variations, here is the live-blog boat fold post from the conference.  

For step-by-step instructions  you can also check out page 95 of Foldforming by Charles Lewton-Brain or go online here.  
foldforming, Charles Lewton-Brain, boat fold
Basic boat fold
It really helped me to see the process in action, though; especially how the initial shape is made with the vise -- and how the rocking motion needs to look while you hammer. 

For more on the 5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference

August is coming to a close soon.  I'll have one more post to wrap things up on the conference.  It will include links to each conference-related post with a short description.   In the meantime, this is how to read all about it!


SueLacy Wired blog
August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the foldforming conference that took place Aug 3-6.  

Click here to view the entire series.
Eva Sherman Designs blog
Check out Eva's blog for another take on the conference. Click here for her August 2012 archive and scroll down to see all her great posts. 


Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.
 
 
A favorite quote from Charles Lewton-Brain:
"If it's not pretty yet, play with it some more."

This was a repeated theme during the conference. A piece can be completely transformed by the way it is opened and arranged.  Since this step makes such an impact, we always watched intently as Charles opened his folds.  

Hope you enjoy this one... a blended star fold with half of it hammered on the closed edge, and half on the open edge.
The finished star... 
foldforming, Charles Lewton-Brain, star fold
Star fold variation
If you want to see Charles hammer this one, the video is here in an earlier post.  

August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.)

 
 
5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference
A foldforming event at Center for Metal Arts, Aug 3-6, 2012... 

This is a collection of quotes and testimonials from workshop attendees and live blog readers.  Where available, names are hotlinked to their web pages.  

Click those!! They are just as interesting as the comments, and lead to a fascinating variety of art and business pages.  And let me know if you see any errors, ok?  This was a late night project.

Quotes from class attendees

Matt Orr
"Fold forming is an activity that I believe forces the entire brain to work harmoniously. It's one of the few things I know of that blurs engineering and art. Charles' masterful instruction combined material science and art in a very easy to understand and accessible manner. Because Fold forming is easy to begin but difficult to master, it offers something for everyone- instant gratification for beginners and never ending challenges for the experienced."      

Nic
"I was very priviledged to learn directly from Charles Lewton Brain and participate in the Fold Forming conference. In addition to the staggering amount of information he imparted, I was struck by how much I still have to learn.  Charles's generosity in imparting his expertise in the arts, metal smithing, business savvy, sources, tools and techniques was an inspiration to me. Finally, the conference transformed how I had viewed silversmithing and opened a door to more possibilities than I had previously thought existed.  I'd repeat the experience in a New York minute."

Warren Rinehart
"I was amazed by Charles' skills in communication and demonstrating the multiple options for manipulating metal with foldform techquiques.  I appreciate the wealth of information.  Four star recommendation!  Top notch."

Eva Sherman / Grand River Beads
"The fold forming conference with Charles Lewton-Brain has been one of the best investments I have ever made in my career as a jewelry designer."  

Eve
"Charles has a wealth of information.  He is very methodical yet accessible.  There is so much, and it is clear, concise, and enjoyable.  He seems to love it and passes that on."

Todd Norman / Acadia Stairs
"I am a welder & I work mostly in steel. Copper fold forming shoulder to shoulder with Charles Lewton-Brain at the Center for Metal Arts helped me better understand how metal moves. Charles showed me his world class examples in a few slides & I was pretty intimidated, but then in just a few minutes he demonstrated simple techniques that showed how quickly these designs can be created.
 
A few years ago, I brought my wife to a fold forming class with metal master Ed Mack at the Center for Metal Arts. My wife & I really enjoyed learning together. Ed was patient with those of us that were new to metal working. He inspired us to experiment with these techniques and to explore the possibilities. I had to bring my brother in law, Tim, who is an aspiring blacksmith this year to see Charles Lewton-Brain -the Lewis & Clark of Fold Forming. Tim & I really enjoyed the session, the one day was not enough! I wish we could have gone for the whole conference.
 
I was able to add to the techniques Ed showed me & will now be incorporating this art form into my stair designs soon!"


Jeff and Lisa
Foldforming is like origami in metal, with science added in, and a more organic shape.  Learning it was lots of fun and we loved the workshop.

Sue Lacy / SueLacy Designs
"The 5th Annual CLB Conference was a return trip for me.  Last year was my first visit and truly a landmark workshop in my career.  I had just discovered foldforming and loved it right away, but still I wasn't prepared for the magic that Charles brings to the learning experience.  He is brilliant and tireless; the four spell-binding days are crammed with information but somehow he never loses his students.  I've since adopted foldforming as a key technique in my jewelry, and find that my customers really connect with the organic designs.  Foldforming also seems to fair well with judges of juried art shows, and I've been grateful for those opportunities.  But perhaps the most welcome benefit is the joy of the process...  really, it's just plain fun."

More great quotes from live blog readers...

Charles Lewton-Brain 
"Sue, what a lovely, fantastic, deep job you are doing! thank you so much for all your work!!!!" 

Allesia
"Every new post is a feast for the eyes and food for my curiosity, and my need to learn. And the chance to see Charles working... he makes everything look so easy! wow... There are so many questions I'd like to ask, but right now I'm enjoyng so much your live blogging :))"  

Carol Meyers
"I'm so sad not to be there with you guys this year. Last year was a lifetime dream. Meeting you and other students was such a blessing and how cool was it to learn foldforming from the ONE AND ONLY Charles Lewton Brain. He is a fabulous teacher, kind and generous with his knowledge and skills. Have wonderful time!"

Jessica Armstrong
"These demonstration images are great. I so wish I could have been there to see all of these in person. The videos are great as well. This particular cross fold is beautiful. Thanks for uploading all the pictures and videos for all of us that could not attend."

Vanessa Parker
"I am enjoying the progress and all the photos from class. I like the photos of the boat folds. They make you smile because they look like a huge metal mouth. Your pinwheel fold from the earlier day looks fabulous and a has nicely delicate edging to it. Thanks for blogging about the class so us 'long distance artists' can view what you are doing." 

Katie Hanrahan
"These are wonderful! I am so loving your blogging about the class. I really wanted to attend but was unable to, so it's great doing it vicariously through your posts & pics. Thank you!!"

Bill
"JUST keeps getting better..............lovin all the PIX..........thanks for "takin US all along on the ride"...."
 
Cecelia
"Sue I can not thank you enough for taking us "there"...!!!! Your pictures are amazing. Thank you for taking the time to download the video. I will be there next year, I can not wait.... :)" 

Lauri K
"Loving all the pictures and the commentary. I bet the reaction to all the submissions was amazing. Wish I could have been there.  Can't wait for the rest." 

Chris Finch
"This is so great to have your live blog, thanks for all the photos. You can't take too many pictures here, post everything, I'm really enjoying this. Wonderful to see the workspace, all that clear room to move. Looking forward to these next days." 

Becky
"This work is incredible. I can't believe this is what he comes up with at a demonstration. I can't wait to see his professional work." 

Mary Hicks
"Thank you for your posts, I would have loved to be there this weekend! Great to be able to connect and see the videos.  Kind regards." 

Dottie Moon
"This is so awesome. Thanks for blogging and filming! Now if we can just get him to San Antonio or Austin!!!!"  

Rhonda Kap
"I wish I could be there. If you come to California I'll be there in a minute. Would love to learn folding from the master." 

Cathe Linton
"So great to see shots of FAM museum work. It's so gratifying to know there are folks still doing this work. The hand, the eye, the heart and soul is in every piece. And we have gotten so far away from seeing it daily." 
Photos are in random order.
August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.) 


 
 
This was an experiment, my first in the category of paper folds and also first try for an ammonia patina.  These are my colors, baby!  I'm officially addicted. 
Here is a link to the day Charles covered paper derived foldforms at the recent conference.
And here is a link to notes about the patina, from the same conference. 
For a whole bunch of patina information, here is a link to notes by Charles Lewton-Brain. 

Update...
Over on the foldforming facebook page there were some questions about this fold and the copper patina process, so lets put a little more detail in this post.  

The fold is the Eckland #2 and can be found on page 144 of Foldforming, by Charles Lewton-Brain.    You can probably see in the photo that only the ends are really 3-dimensional.  The entire cuff was originally puffed out, but as Charles teaches, any fold can become a line fold.  Just on a whim, this cuff is all hammered flat except for two sections at one end, and one section at the other.  The ends are cut round.

As for the patina, it's fumed in ammonia and then painted with hydrogen peroxide, exactly the way Charles demonstrated at the conference, here.  Really go see because it illustrates the flexibility of your choices... he used a take-out container because it was on hand... but here is what I'm using:
The container I found for fuming is so awesome it warrants a close-up view.  All of you might not have access to this, but it's an empty plastic baby formula container with a nice tight seal.  The seal is not critical to the process, but it sure helps contain the nasty ammonia smell!  


OOPS!

cute baby alert...
(sorry, couldn't resist.)
Anyway, here were the steps:
**and make sure you have proper ventilation***
  1. Begin with pickled copper.  Pickle isn't in the photo but basically you just need very clean copper.  Your first time out, use some scrap!
  2. Wash the copper with dish washing liquid mixed with a drop of ammonia, just to get it even cleaner.
  3. Pour a little ammonia (I used about 1/2") in the bottom of the Similac container.
  4. Put the little plastic platform in the container upside-down, right into the ammonia. The platform I used was the bottom of a shampoo bottle.  Note that most of the platform is NOT submerged... this is a fuming process not a dunking process.
  5. Hold your clean copper only by the edges, possibly even with latex gloves on (although I didn't do that) so as not to transfer fingerprints or oils to the piece.
  6. Dunk your piece in a saltwater solution.   I probably used a couple teaspoons of salt in 1/2 cup water but that's completely made up.  DON'T sprinkle salt right on the piece.  It will mottle the color and can pit the metal.  Note: salt is not required, but it speeds up the process.  The water IS required, though.    
  7. Place the copper piece onto the (shampoo bottle) platform and close the lid tight.
  8. In a few hours, take the piece out.  There will be a lot of color.  Run it under water and gently go over it with a soft toothbrush.  Try not to cry as a lot of the color comes right off.
  9. Repeat steps 5-8 every few hours until you're happy with the color coverage.  This one was "finished" in about 2 days.  I would call the color a deep teal, I think.
  10. Optionally at the end, brush on a little diluted hydrogen peroxide.  (I didn't actually dilute it here... so play with that mixture as you like.)  Those areas will turn green, and the overall effect is kind of a rich ocean blend.
  11. Wash off your piece right away to stop the process.  It can turn black, if I remember correctly... 
  12. My piece isn't clear coated yet but here is a link where Charles describes his favorite products for that.

Update #2:
Ten days later tried to use the leftover ammonia in the 'airtight' container, thinking it would work on another piece.  No go.  It no longer smelled strong and after a few hours there was no color on the piece.  Tossed it and poured fresh ammonia, which worked.  This was a surprise to me!

Update #3:  Here's a little tip -- there are no 2nd chances on step #6.  I forgot and put the pieces in dry, and the blue color just puddled up underneath.  The piece gets kind of an antique patina instead of blue.  At this point it's too late to dunk the piece into saltwater -- it's like starting with a dirty piece, and it just doesn't work.  Need to completely clean it up and start again.  **However** if you want a bit of an antique patina, give it a try dry :-)     
 
Comments welcome.

August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.)  


 
 
This is a clip of Charles Lewton-Brain demonstrating how to tell when metal is annealed.  The flame turns orange as it leaves the metal.  This is effective for all base and precious metals, excluding platinum.

While it's true the demo takes place in a lit room, you might try dimming the lights to make the color change easier to see.
Metal work-hardens when it is folded, hammered, etc.  It becomes inflexible and can even crack at a certain point, making it unworkable.  When heated to annealing temperature, its molecular structure realigns and the metal becomes soft and flexible again.   

Because foldforming is a technique that work-hardens metal pretty aggressively -- and then requires the metal to be soft for unfolding -- annealing is critical to the process.   And since it's a frequent step for metalsmiths in a wide variety of situations, it seems like a perfect clip to share from the conference. 

August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.) 


 
 
Charles Lewton-Brain, foldforming
Charles Lewton-Brain
I’ve been asked for the condensed version of what to expect at a Charles Lewton-Brain Conference at the Center for Metal Arts.  This is based on all my notes and posts, which did not cover everything.  And since it's *my unofficial* version of the agenda, it's not perfect.  Also note!  Charles adapts to the needs and interests of his students, so content will vary…

Day 1

Slide show and lecture
  •   What is foldforming and how is it used today?
  •   Artist work
  •   Mental models, basic principles
  •   Terminology and overview of main foldforming categories
  •   Step-through of some processes via slides
  •   How and why foldforming models nature
  •   Tools considerations

Lunch lecture: Bench Tricks
Charles offers a variety of topics including Bench Tricks, Small Scale Photography, Making Chasing Tools, and Jeweler’s Bench. Students vote for the day’s topic.

Demonstrations:
  •   Line folds
  •   Star folds
  •   Pleats
  •   Heistad Cup

Hands-on time for students 3:15- 5pm
6pm Pot luck dinner and viewing of entries for the Lewton-Brain Foldform Award



Day 2

Impromptu pre-class discussion of patinas led Charles to set up a quick ammonia patina demo that was revisited many times. Students could patina their work if they wished.

Demo reviews by request 
Each morning Charles asks students which folds they would like to see demo’d again, and he runs through them all.

New demonstrations:
  •   Rolled folds including Heistad, Plunkett, Good
  •   T-folds and wedge t-folds
  •   Leg and table insert technique
  •   Romero fold
  •   Chasing-on-air
  •   Combined chasing-on-air and T-fold
  •   Scoring/bending

Lunch lecture: Making Chasing Tools  (occurred at some point between demos.)
Hands-on time for students 3-5pm



Day 3

Demo reviews by request

New demonstrations:
  •   Forged Good fold
  •   Boat folds
  •   Cross folds
  •   Belly button

Lunch lecture: Making Chasing Tools (occurred at some point between demos.)

Recommended metal books
Hydraulic press slide lecture
Hands-on time for students 3-5pm
Dinner outing



Day 4

Demo reviews by request
More about patinas
More about scoring and bending

Lunch: an impromptu field trip to Harbor Freight; a guided tour of tools by CLB

New demonstrations:
  •   How to make a ruffle
  •   Folds derived from paper models (Ward, Eckland, others)

Lewton-Brain Foldform Award winners announced and viewed
Hands-on time for students 4-5pm


August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.) 


 
 
Rhoda Mack of Center for Metal Arts asked me to pass this along...

"If you want to get an email notice about the DATE FOR NEXT YEAR's CONFERENCE, email info@centerformetalarts.com with CLB 2013 in the subject line."

This little snippet from the 5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference shows Charles working on several line folds that have different leg lengths.  The point of the demo is that shorter leg length means greater curvature.  It seems like a small point but it's a foundation concept and major design choice.  

Notice the heavy, rhythmic blows.  The piece is moving, not the hammer, just like fabric moves under a sewing machine needle.  Periodically Charles switches to a flat-faced rawhide hammer to flatten out the piece, and that's important too.
I had the camera on a tripod early in the conference so it's not a tight view but I hope you can see and hear enough to get the main points.  I think it really helps to see the hammering style even from here... hope you agree.

These are the pieces made in the video.  It's the only shot I got...  you can see there is more curve on the piece with shorter legs (sides), as compared to the bottom piece with longer legs.  Too bad there isn't a side view of the top left piece. Sorry not perfect but does it make sense?  
I'll get another post out within the week so stop back.


August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.) 

 
 
Well here it is the early-morning after.  Four jam-packed days flew by faster than you can believe.  We're not live anymore, but yesterday got away from me and there is some fill-in to do.  Let's catch up with another post or two today, and then weekly through August as I go through notes and video.  Does that sound like a plan?  

First of all, wow.  Congratulations to recipients of the 2012 Lewton-Brain Foldform Award.  Click that link and feast your eyes.  Absolutely stunning work.

Repeat demos
Charles began the day by asking which folds we'd like to see demonstrated again, as review.  Each morning begins this way.  We pick up samples from the huge collection on the table and Charles works through them one by one.   
Today's requests included an extruded line fold, a chased t-fold (chasing on air), boat variations, and that beautiful cross-fold/T-fold combination.  Charles also gave us a ruffle demo, reviewed scoring/bending methods, and talked more about patinas.  

Just a note... through all of these demos, Charles often hops online to show us artists' work that uses the particular fold or fold family he is teaching.  It really helps with perspective and application ideas. 


Insert spontaneous field trip here :-D

Harbor Freight, Charles Lewton-Brain Conference

At lunch we all piled into cars for a field trip to Harbor Freight.  OK, folks.  I have never had so much fun in a store.  In my entire life.  

Picture an hour in that seriously inexpensive and well-stocked establishment with Charles Lewton-Brain as your tour guide.  

Which tools are most useful?  Which can be completely re-purposed for your needs, or have uses you never dreamed of?  If there are six variations, which one do you want?  Which are the great deals?  Which to avoid?  Holy moly, Batman. 

Folds derived from paper models

After the announcement of the 2012 Lewton-Brain Foldform Award winners, we got back down to business and learned to do folds derived from paper models, e.g., the Ward and Eckland folds.  Here are some pics from that session.
That was a wrap chronologically, but more posts soon to fill in some gaps.  Not sure if I can upload any video in this hotel room or not... and about giveaway, I'll get the winners tonight and post soon after.  So stop back!
August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.) 

 
 
Lewton-Brain Foldform Award 2012

First place

Rauni Higson
Rauni Higson, Undersea Candelabra, Lewton-Brain foldform award, first place, foldforming
Undersea Candelabra by Rauni Higson
Artist statement:  Inspired by an underwater forest of seaweed swaying in the current, the two part Candelabra can be arranged in various formations to sculptural effect. The rising elements combine Anticlastic and Synclastic forming with Fold-forming, to support the 8 candle cups at various heights.  Height 45cm. Sterling silver. 

 
Second place 

Theresa Nguyen
Spiritus, Theresa Nguyen, Lewton-Brain foldform award, 2nd place
Spiritus by Theresa Nguyen
Artist statement: The inspiration for this piece came from observing how plant life get their sustenance from the sun and reach out and respond to its energy.  Fold forming was the key technique that I used in shaping the silver, the aim being to try and capture the energy of life that comes from the sun and the energy that is fully on display in the natural world.  (Photo credit: Richard Valencia Ltd)


Third place

Kaiya Rainbolt
Kaiya Rainbold, Quadrant, Lewton-Brain Foldform Award, 3rd place, foldforming
Quadrant by Kaiya Rainbolt
Artist statement: This piece has its origins in the 12x12 series, and also has no solder or cold connections of any kind.  5” x 6” x  11.5”  (Photo credit: Sibila Savage Photography)



Honorable Mention

Grant McCaig
Grant McCaig, Lewton-Brain foldform award, Honorable Mention, foldforming
Pleated Silver Drinking Set on Ebonised Base by Grant McCaig
Artist statement:  I have always been aware of fold forming as a structural technique, however I came to the process through a desire to give the blank sheets of silver, that come from the bullion suppliers, some character before starting to form the vessels. The lines on the surface exaggerate the movement of the metal compressing and expanding across the surface. 


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August 2012 on SueLacy Wired is dedicated to the 5th annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference on Foldforming, taking place Aug 3-6 at the Center for Metal Arts in downstate NY.  To view the series, click category "5th Annual Charles Lewton-Brain Conference" in the far right column on this page.
(Are you a metalsmith interested in foldforming?  Join our official Facebook group.) 
 

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